Mar 31, 2015

Before the Radio Flyer,there was the Studebaker Junior Wagon

Studebaker Jr Wagon
From my appraisal archives comes a relatively rare estate find: a Studebaker Junior Wagon.

Vintage car enthusiasts are likely familiar with Studebaker automobiles; they were manufactured form 1902 to1966. Studebaker began as a blacksmith shop in Indiana in 1852, and when the Civil War broke out the Studebaker brothers became a major vendor of supply wagons to the Union Army. Studebaker continued to make wagons and carriages until the early 20th century, when the company began to produce automobiles.

This Studebaker Junior Wagon, in need of restoration with chipped, peeling and worn paint some age cracks in the wood, is still a relatively rare find and worth $500 to $600.
This Studebaker Junior Wagon, in need of restoration with chipped, peeling and worn paint some age cracks in the wood, is still a relatively rare find and worth $500 to $600.

Studebaker Junior Wagons were promotional items; they were carried by retail Studebaker dealerships. Originally intended to promote Studebaker farm wagons, the Junior became so popular that it continued to be sold at Studebaker car dealerships even after Studebaker stopped making farm wagons. The wagons were built for children, and were usually pulled by a goat, large dog, big brother or Dad.

The first Studebaker Junior wagons were built by Studebaker, but the wagons were in such demand that production was taken over by Indiana’s South Bend Toy Company. With increased production, distribution became nationwide when the wagons were offered through the Sears, Roebuck catalog and toy retailers. The wagon typically sold for $9 to $12. Early ads for the product featured President Teddy Roosevelt’s son Quentin. Read More

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